Posts Tagged ‘Education’

Dear Mr Manning…

http://www.denverpost.com/opinion/ci_25077270/dear-mr-manning

Screen Shot 2013-03-06 at 8.48.55 AMOver the past month, the video craze of “The Harlem Shake” by Bauuer has essentially done just that, shaken-up cyberspace via thousands of youtube videos being filmed in schools, offices, firetrucks, shopping malls, dentist offices and more.  If you can think of something crazy it pretty much happened –  from The University of Georgia Men’s Swim Team filming an underwater version, to Lebron James and The Miami Heat filming a locker room scene.

Students from all over the world participated; from middle school classrooms, to high school students in recreation centers, to multiple college-aged students in various settings – the participation level is at an all-time high.

Some powerful themes jumped out to me based on such a strong sweeping trend of this Harlem Shake craze:

1. Students love MUSIC.  The song “Harlem Shake” by Bauuer is energetic and brings people together for a comedic purpose.  Get your playlist together. Use music in your lesson plans, classroom culture, school settings and recreation centers as much as possible. Music is one of few universal languages and should be an integral part of the educational experience.

2. Students enjoy SURPRISES. Thirty-seconds into the song when the beat drops, everyone begins to dance crazily with a surprise prop or off-the-wall costume. This should be a reminder that students enjoy when principals, coaches, counselors and teachers switch things up, change the pace, and ultimately – deliver the unexpected.

3. All students want to PARTICIPATE – The sheer volume of students around the globe that wanted to make these videos and participate is ridiculous.  Use this to your advantage; let students work in teams to film, edit, produce and showcase their creativity for a different purpose – they will not let you down! Some students enjoy being the center of the video, while others are comfortable being in the back doing their own dance – but they all want to be included.

4. You Must Use SOCIAL MEDIA. Many students had already watched hundreds of these videos and recorded their own versions before many adults even realized what the video was.  We need to understand and respect the speed at which trends take life in the culture of our youth. In addition, we need to embrace the power of social media in our classrooms and schools to properly teach students how to share, research and interact globally.

5. Students simply want to have FUN. It’s easy for us as educators to get lost on the whirlwind of legislation reform, policies, standardized testing and new evaluation systems. I will be the first to admit that all of these changes often impact my attitude and interactions with others. We must remember that students are still kids and they deserve to have fun. And as adults, we need to make sure we never lose our own youthful spirits.

Here’s 5  simple ways to apply this article to your own setting:

  • Ask a student walking by in the hallway what’s playing in their ipod  and watch the expression on their face.  See where the conversation takes you…
  • Film a Harlem Shake video with your colleagues….perhaps at a staff meeting.
  • Think of a surprise for an individual, group or classroom of students that you can deliver to change things up. It can be small-scale or something huge.
  • Take 2 minutes to ask a few students how much fun they have recently been having at school or in classrooms and listen to their responses.
  • Finally, find a student that you know is not involved with anything at school – and simply invite them to participate in an activity, club or group.   The simple fact that you personally took the time to ask a student to get involved will change your relationship with that child.

Onward and Upward,

William T. Sprankles III

Princeton City School, 6-12 Principal

@PHSViking

What it Means to be a Vuck (Viking-Duck)

 

 

Today, during senior college seminars, one of our sessions included a reference to a new school motto: “Be like a duck. Calm on the outside but paddling like the dickens underneath.” Dr. Crouse, the session leader, passed out rubber ducks to a few of us that were dressed in Viking gear; hence the Vuck.

As we learned, and as the saying tells us, being a duck consists of working ridiculously hard at something (or multiple things) and making it look easy. But what does it mean to be a Vuck? Sure we’re ducks who go to Princeton, and we have pride in our school, but even though all of us are Vikings, not all of us are (or can be) Vucks. Mr. Everett Lamar told us very simply today to “stop making excuses!” He reminded us that we must have a “by any means necessary” mentality, and throughout the day, we were told repeatedly that we had to be willing to do whatever it took to get to where we wanted to be. We watched the popular motivational video with the saying, “When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you’ll be successful.” A Vuck, I have determined, is a special sort of Viking who is the epitome of a person who is willing to do whatever it takes to accomplish their goals.

Princeton’s job, as a school, is to give us, as students, the tools it takes to be successful, and in four years, we are generally given that opportunity. Like Dora the Explorer, all the tools we need are in our backpack. The Vucks are the Princeton students who take advantage of said tools and through hard work and dedication achieve the success we heard about all day at school. They are the leaders of the school, and the people the rest of us Vikings want to follow after. People like 2012 alumnus Claudia Saunders are Vucks. Claudia was third in her class, won state championships in two different sports and is now running at Stanford University. She never let anyone tell her she couldn’t do something, and she is the Vuck I want to be like.

My message to students: Always strive to be a Vuck. My question to them: What is it going to take for you to become a Vuck? Start paddling. It’s worth it.

 

By Emily Roper

Princeton High School, c/o 2013

Scholar, Athlete, Mentor, Visionary, Ambassador, Friend, Daughter. Leader……Viking Duck

Below are 10 very thought-provoking articles, blogs, video clips and other resources for Educators and anyone leading Organizational Change.  The list is diverse in its purpose and topics. Furthermore, the links provide a strategic set of tools for your #Leadership

I came across these wonderful finds due to the folks I follow on Twitter.  Enjoy, and follow me on twitter @PHSViking to broaden your Personal / Professional Learning Network.

The Power of Effective Feedback

Written By Peter Dewitt via Education Week – @PeterMDeWitt

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/finding_common_ground/2012/08/the_power_of_effective_feedback.html?intc=es

The Flipped Faculty Meeting

Written By Peter Dewitt via Education Week – @PeterMDeWitt

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/finding_common_ground/2012/09/the_flipped_faculty_meeting.html?utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed

Video: Recorded Open House Presentation by Mrs. Johnson

Shared by @teachingwhtsoul via @PrincipalJ

Favorite / Thought Provoking Quote:

Shared by @AnnTran_

“We never know which lives we influence, or when, or why.” ― Stephen King

Handling Co-Worker Complaints and Backstabbing

Written By @LeadershipFreak via WordPress

http://leadershipfreak.wordpress.com/2012/08/30/handling-co-worker-complaints-and-backstabbing/

Favorite / Thought Provoking Quote:

Shared by Lead Change Group ‏via @leadchangegroup

“When you’re a professional, you come back, no matter what happened the day before.” – Billy Martin

The Best Apps for Teaching Math and Science

Shared by @NMHS_Principal via The Wall Street Journal Technology Report

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444860104577561094256316390.html?KEYWORDS=teach%20kids%20math%20and%20science&utm_source=buffer&buffer_share=a22b2

 

The Principal Melt-Down Video

Shared by @WiscPrincipal

http://youtu.be/dDASxk5kiDw

Free Reproducibles from Marzano for Coaching & Evaluating

Shared by @MarzanoResearch

http://www.marzanoresearch.com/reproducibles/coaching_classroom.aspx?utm_campaign=Argyle%2BSocial-2012-08&utm_content=sarah&utm_medium=Argyle%2BSocial&utm_source=twitter&utm_term=2012-08-29-13-09-12

50 Educational Tools Every Teacher Should Know About

Shared by @KleinErin via @edudemic 

http://kleinerin.visibli.com/share/tDXGBd

 

Last month I had a major failure.  I published a blog of “10 Great Stars to Follow in the Twitterverse.”  Within one hour, I was flooded with angry questions and comments of “Where are the Women?”

After all, the blog consisted of 10 white males (all amazing leaders though).  And after processing and reflecting, I couldn’t believe myself.   As a Principal and Educator that preaches Culturally Responsive Practices of perhaps the most diverse high school in the State of Ohio, my Twitter list failed to have Digital Diversity.

So, I began reflecting on the cultural shift to Social Media.  DIGITAL DIVERSITY is a MUST.

A series of reflective questions immediately flooded my conscience:

  • Do I follow enough women, men, people of color and those from different classes in our society?
  • Do I follow people on Twitter that ONLY validate and support my ideas? Or, do I intentionally follow people that challenge, contradict and bring alternative perspectives to my digital feed?
  • Do I follow the ‘little guy’ from the small business or tiny school district, or only seek out digital leaders with thousands?
  • Do I fear following people with opposing or different viewpoints and ideas?

Lesson Learned:

While many of us cannot change or control the diversity that surrounds us on a daily basis, we can use the internet to circumvent the obstacles of geography, class, color, religion and more.

No longer can we as educators claim we “did not know,” — as it is our responsibility to explore and embrace a digital world that is more diverse than we could ever imagine and wish for.

Whether your digital network, or the people you surround yourself with daily, you must have diversity in your life. Challenge yourself to learn and grow from others not in your regular social circle.  Hear their perspectives and try to see what they see.

Be Reflective and Seek out Digital Diversity – IT is a MUST.

William T. Sprankles III

District Principal, 6-12

Princeton City Schools

http://www.twitter.com/phsviking

This video is the kick-off of our 6-12 Model at Princeton City School District. We believe that ALL students have #Greatness, and it is our job as Educators to help them Discover their Passion.

#HailVikings
#PrincetonPride

For those of you new to Twitter – or if you are wishing to get more Value and Diversity from the Leaders you follow – begin by seeking out these 10 Stars in the Twitterverse.

In no particular order, the below 1o educators are great leaders to follow on Twitter for the following reasons:

  • They are always active, but never overwhelming on your twitter feed.
  • They will challenge you to Think and Reflect – and push you to grow professionally
  • They will provide resources and guidance
  • They focus on Technology and Best Educational Practices
  • They are all Unique, Practical and provide Authentic Leadership

For your convenience – all 10 profiles below are hyper-linked directly to their Twitter Accounts.

 

Written by:

William T. Sprankles III – @PHSViking

Princeton City Schools, 6-12 Principal

 

 

Bonus Star in the Twitterverse: John C Maxwell – Leader of Leaders…

 

By William T. Sprankles III

Princeton, 6-12 Principal

www.twitter.com/PHSViking